2019 CBCAP Report

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

2018- 2019
End of Year Evaluation Report

Community Based child abuse prevention
CBCAP

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Adult Participant Demographics

In CBCAP funded programs, 1,001 adults
were served through program offerings
across program types: parent education,
home visiting, fatherhood, and respite).
Parents are racially diverse and
predominantly of lower socio-economic
status, based on work status, education
level, and income reported. Note: Adults
who participated only in community
awareness programs did not provide
demographic information.

Number of Children*

  • 1% 0 Children
  • 24% 1 child
  • 30% 2 children
  • 25% 3-5 children
  • 20% 5 or more children

*Includes biological, step, adopted, and foster children

Age

Median age = 34

  • 1% were 18 and younger; 13% were 19-
    24; 22% were 25-30; 38% were 31-40;
    and 26% were over 40

Work Status Pre-Program**

  • 61% reported not working for pay
  • 13% reported working part-time
  • 26% reported working full-time

Gender

  • 84% female
  • 16% male

Race & Ethnicity

  • 56% European American/White
  • 36% African American/Black
  • 1% Asian American
  • 1% Native American
  • 6% Other race

*Of all participants, 7% identified as  Hispanic or Latino

Education Level Pre-Program **

  • 17% reported not completing high
    school
  • 52% reported completing high school
    or GED
  • 8% reported obtaining 2-year
    college/associate school degree
  • 9% reported obtaining a
    trade/technical school degree
  • 11% reported completing a 4-year
    college degree
  • 3% reported completing an advanced
    degree

Relationship Status

  • 32% Single, never married
  • 12% Committed relationship (not
    married)
  • 33% Married
  • 7% Separated, not currently in a
    relationship
  • 13% Divorced, not currently in a
    relationship
  • 3% Widowed, not currently in a
    relationship

Income Level Pre-Program**

  • 43% reported a gross yearly income of
    less than $10,000 a year
  • 29% reported earning $10,000-29,999
  • 19% reported earning $30,000-59,999
  • 9% reported earning more than
    $60,000 per year
  • 3% reported completing an advanced
    degree

**For participants (excluding students) over
the age of 18

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Youth Participant Demographics

In CBCAP funded programs, 13,815 youth were served through school-based, non-school based/after school, and mentoring programs and indicate that participants were diverse. Note: Youth who participated only in community awareness programs did not provide demographic
information.

Grade

  • 93% were in grades 3-5
  • 7% were in grades 6-12

Gender

  • 49% female
  • 51% male

Race & Ethnicity

Youth program participants were:

  • 53% European American/White
  • 30% African American/Black
  • 1% Native American
  • 1% Asian American
  • 15% Other race

*Of all participants, 11% identified as Hispanic or Latino

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Parent Education and Home Visiting Demographics

Parents who participated in Parent Education classes and Home Visiting programs are racially diverse and predominantly of lower socio-economic status, based on work status, education level, and income reported. Participants were predominantly women.

Age

  • Parents in Parent Education/Home
    Visiting programs had a median
    age of 34.
  • 1% were 18 and younger; 14% were
    19-24; 23% were 25-30; 37% were
    31-40; and 25% were over 40

Number of Children*

  • 1% 0 Children
  • 25% 1 child
  • 29% 2 children
  • 16% 3-4 children
  • 29% 5 or more children

*Includes biological, step, adopted, and foster children

Gender

  • 86% female
  • 14% male

Race & Ethnicity

  • 52% European American/White
  •  40% African American/Black
  • 1% Asian American
  • 7% Other race

*Of all participants, 8% identified as Hispanic or Latino

Work Status Pre-Program**

  • 62% reported not working for pay
  • 12% reported working part-time
  • 26% reported working full-time

Education Level Pre-Program **

  • 18% reported not completing high school
  • 55% reported completing high school or GED
  • 8% reported obtaining 2-year college/associate school degree
  • 9% reported obtaining a trade/technical school degree
  • 8% reported completing a 4-year college degree
  • 2% reported completing an advanced degree

Relationship Status

  • 34% Single, never married
  • 12% Committed relationship (not
    married)
  • 31% Married
  • 7% Separated, not currently in a
    relationship
  • 13% Divorced, not currently in a
    relationship
  • 3% Widowed, not currently in a
    relationship

Income Level Pre-Program**

  • 46% reported a gross yearly income of less
    than $10,000 a year
  • 30% reported earning $10,000-29,999
  • 17% reported earning $30,000-59,999
  • 7% reported earning more than $60,000
    per year

**For participants (excluding students) over the age of 18

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Parent Education and Home Visiting Programs

Eight programs provided parent education/home visiting through hospital visits, group education, and home visits. Goals of the home visiting /parent education programs center on participant improvement in:

  • stress management skills
  • skills to manage maltreatment risk
  • understanding various forms of child
    maltreatment
  • medical care commitment
  • positive parenting skills and child
    development knowledge
  • knowledge and use of support
    services
  • use of informal support networks

These goals promote several protective factors emphasized by the “Strengthening Families Program™.”

A sample of Parenting participants (n =595) responded to an assessment of 7 goals. Analyses of measures (some using multi-items; Cronbach’s α ranges from.68-.87) using paired sample t-tests

revealed statistically significant (p<.001) improvements for participants, on average, in ALL targeted areas. The effect sizes ranged from .78-1.27. The average magnitude of the effect sizes for these improvements was 1.08 and can be considered large (i.e. .25 small effect; .50 moderate effect; .75 large effect).

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Parental Resilience

Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development

Concrete Support in Times of Need & Social Connections

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Respite Care Demographics

Age

  • Parents in Respite Care programs
    had a median age of 39.
  • 10% were 25-30; 45% were 31-40;
    and 45% were over 40

Gender

  • 94% female
  • 6% male

Race & Ethnicity

  • 82% European American/White
  • 16% African American/Black
  • 1% Asian American
  • 1% Native American

*Of all participants, 1% identified as
Hispanic or Latino

Number of Children*

  • 17% 1 child
  • 36% 2 children
  • 25% 3-4 children
  • 22% 5 or more children

*Includes biological, step, adopted, and foster children

Work Status Pre-Program**

  • 52% reported not working for pay
  • 25% reported working part-time
  • 23% reported working full-time

Relationship Status

  • 13% Single, never married
  • 2% Committed relationship (not
    married)
  • 62% Married
  • 6% Separated, not currently in a
    relationship
  • 14% Divorced, not currently in a
    relationship
  • 3% Widowed, not currently in a
    relationship

Education Level Pre-Program **

  • 4% reported not completing high school
  • 27% reported completing high school or
    GED
  • 15% reported obtaining 2-year college/associate school degree
  • 11% reported obtaining a trade/technical
    school degree
  • 34% reported completing a 4-year college
    degree
  • 9% reported completing an advanced
    degree

Income Level Pre-Program**

  • 12% reported a gross yearly income of less
    than $10,000 a year
  • 25% reported earning $10,000-29,999
  • 35% reported earning $30,000-59,999
  • 28% reported earning more than $60,000
    per year

**For participants (excluding students) over the age of 18

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Respite Care Programs

Three programs provided respite care services and parenting information for parents of special needs children. Goals of respite programs center on participant improvement in:

  • stress level
  • positive view of one’s child
  • knowledge and use of support services
  • use of informal support networks

These goals promote several protective factors emphasized by the “Strengthening Families Program™.”

A sample of Respite Care participants (n = 83) responded to an assessment of 4 goals. Analyses of measures (some using multiitems; Cronbach’s α ranges from .66 -.90) using paired sample t-tests

revealed statistically significant (p<.001) improvements for participants, on average, in ALL targeted areas. The effect sizes ranged from 1.07-1.53. The average magnitude of the effect sizes for these improvements was 1.25 and can be considered large (i.e. .25 small effect; .50 moderate effect; .75 large effect)

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Parental Resilience

Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development

Concrete Support in Times of Need

Social Connections

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Fatherhood Program Demographics

Parents who participated in Fatherhood programs are racially diverse and predominantly of lower socio-economic status, based on work status, education level, and income reported. Participants were predominantly men.

Age

  • Parents in Fatherhood programs had a median age of 33.
  • 27% were 19-24; 17% were 25-30; 36% were 31-40; and 20% were over 40

Number of Children*

  • 32% 1 child
  • 16% 2 children
  • 28% 3-4 children
  • 24% 5 or more children

Gender

  • 100% male

Race & Ethnicity

  • 73% European American/White
  • 17% African American/Black
  • 3% Native American
  • 7% Other race

*Of all participants, none identified as
Hispanic or Latino

Number of Children living in the home some or all of the time*

  • 11% 0 Children
  • 32% 1 child
  • 37% 2 children
  • 20% 3-4 children

*Includes biological, step, adopted, and foster children

Relationship Status

  • 31% Single, never married
  • 28% Committed relationship (not
    married)
  • 17% Married
  • 14% Separated, not currently in a
    relationship
  • 10% Divorced, not currently in a
    relationship

Work Status Pre-Program**

  • 69% reported not working for pay
  • 10% reported working part-time
  • 21% reported working full-time

Longevity of Current Employment**

  • 20% Employed for less than 1 month
  • 20% Employed 6-12 months
  • 60% Employed for 1 year or more

**For participants (excluding students) over the age of 18

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Fatherhood Program Demographics
(continued)

Education Level Pre-Program **

  • 23% reported not completing high school
  • 53% reported completing high school or GED
  • 10% reported obtaining 2-year college/associate school degree
  • 10% reported obtaining a trade/technical school degree
  • 4% reported completing an advanced degree

Income Level Pre-Program**

  • 76% reported a gross yearly income of less than $10,000 a year
  • 16% reported earning $10,000-29,999
  • 8% reported earning $30,000-59,999

Public Assistance**

  • 38% reported receiving SNAP (EBT/food stamps) 
  • 27% reported not receiving either form of public assistance

**For participants (excluding students) over the age of 18

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Fatherhood Programs

Community Based Child Abuse Prevention (CBCAP) provided funding for 1 Fatherhood program. Fatherhood programs provide case management and classes. They focus on enhancing employability through education and job skills training. They also provide educational information on child development and positive parenting strategies and emphasize the value of
positive involvement with children and child support obligation compliance. Mothers are invited to participate in classes as well. Goals of fatherhood programs are:

  • commitment to couple relationship stability
  • conflict management skills 
  • communication 
  • coparenting conflict^ 
  • dating abuse prevention skills 
  • positive parenting behavior
  • parent involvement
  • parent-child relationship quality
  • hopeful about future
  • financial responsibility
  • perception of economic stability
  • cooperation with child support personnel
  • commitment to pay full child support
  • child academic adjustment

These goals promote several protective factors emphasized by the “Strengthening Families Program™.”

A sample of Fatherhood participants (n = 28) responded to an assessment of 14 goals. Analyses of measures (some using multi-items; Cronbach’s α ranges from .51-.99) using paired sample t-tests

revealed statistically significant (p<.001) improvements in all but two targeted areas. The effect sizes ranged from .07 – .99). The average magnitude of the effect sizes for these improvements was .57 and can be considered moderate (i.e. .25 small effect; .50 moderate effect; .75 large effect)

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Social Connections

Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Concrete Support in Times of Need

Social and Emotional Competence of Children

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Youth Programs 3rd-5th Grade Demographics

Data on youth demographics from school-based, non-school based/after school, and mentoring programs offered to children in 3rd – 5th grade indicate that participants were diverse. Note: Youth who participated only in community awareness programs did not provide demographic information.

Gender

  • 49% female
  • 51% male

Race & Ethnicity

Youth program participants were:

  • 52% European American/White
  • 31% African American/Black
  • 1% Native American
  • 1% Asian American
  • 15% Other race

*Of all participants, 11% identified as Hispanic or Latino

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Youth Programs 3rd-5th Grade

Youth in 3rd-12th grade around the state were served through three programs that included a variety of school-based, nonschool-based/after school, and mentoring programs. These programs varied in their emphasis, but all were focused on reducing risks for children and enhancing their well-being by promoting the
protective factor: social and emotional competence of children.

Program objectives for youth in 3rd-5th
grade center on:

  • social skills
  • abuse awareness
  • self confidence
  • emotion identification & regulation
  • assertiveness
  • cooperative behavior

A sample of 3rd-5th grade participants (n= 659) responded to an assessment of 6 goals. Analyses of measures (some using multi-items; Cronbach’s α ranges from .49 – .57) using paired sample t-tests

revealed statistically significant (p<.001)
improvements for participants, on average, in ALL targeted areas. The effect sizes ranged from .45-.93. The average magnitude of the effect sizes for these improvements was .67 and can be considered moderate to large (i.e. .25
small effect; .50 moderate effect; .75 large
effect).

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Social and Emotional Competence of Children

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Youth Programs 6th-12th Grade Demographics

Data on youth demographics from school-based, non-school based/after school, and mentoring programs offered to children in 6th-12thh grade indicate that participants were diverse. Note: Youth who participated only in community awareness programs did not provide demographic information.

Gender

  • 52% female
  • 48% male

Race & Ethnicity

Youth program participants were:

  • 71% European American/White
  • 12% African American/Black
  • 4% Native American
  • 2% Asian American
  • 11% Other race

*Of all participants, 11% identified as Hispanic or Latino

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Youth Programs 6th-12th Grade

Youth in 3rd-12th grade around the state were served through three programs that included a variety of school-based, nonschool-based/after school, and mentoring programs. These programs varied in their emphasis, but all were focused on reducing risks for children and enhancing their well-being by promoting the
protective factor: social and emotional competence of children.

Program objectives for youth in 6th-12th
grade center on:

  • emotion knowledge of self
  • emotion knowledge of others
  • self confidence
  • social competence
  • commitment to avoid delinquent & risky behavior
  • cooperative behavior
  • abuse awareness & resourcefulness

A sample of 6th-12th grade participants (n= 222) responded to an assessment of 7 goals. Analyses of measures (some using multi-items; Cronbach’s α ranges from .57 – .79) using paired sample t-tests

revealed statistically significant (p<.001)
improvements for participants, on average, in ALL targeted areas. The effect sizes ranged from .15-.32. The average magnitude of the effect sizes for these improvements was .25 and can be considered small (i.e. .25 small effect; .50 moderate effect; .75 large effect).

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

Social and Emotional Competence of Children

The Alabama Department of child abuse and Neglect prevention: the children’s trust fund

2018- 2019 report

We are so appreciative of our long-time partnership with ADCANP’s Director, the inspiring and devoted Sallye Longshore and Tracy Plummer, Deputy Director and their wonderful staff and Board of Directors. This is truly a great team effort and we cannot thank you enough for your unending support and investment in this initiative and in us, as a research team. You are visionaries and it is our privilege and pleasure t o work for you and with you.

We also would like to acknowledge the hard work and dedication of the community agency staff all around the state reflet ed in this report. We are privileged to give voice to the citizens in our communities that benefitfrcrn ttese p car ams. While our job centers on reporting the numbers and analytic results of program effectiveness assessments, we never lose sight of the powerful, collective story we witness every day. It is truly awe-inspiring. Lives are changed every day- and the evidence continues to mount to validate the investments in these programs. Youth and adults in the programs are learning, growing, and feeling more connected and hopeful about ensuring a strong and loving family. As researchers in human development and family sciences, we have no doubt that the benefit w e are seeing will have positive ripple effects for generations to come.

Last year, Jane Goodall visited Auburn’s campus. She shared many stories and words of wisdom gained from her travels and interactions with people around the world. One quote that resonates end reflets the work of ADCANP and their partners is this:

“You cannot get through a single day without having an impact on the world around you. What you do Makes  difference , and you have to decide what kind of difference you want to make.” Jane Goodall

PY 2018-2019 Report

submitted in October by:

Project Director

Francesca Adler-Baeder, Ph.D., CFLE Professor, Human Development

and Family Studies

Project Staff

Ami Landers, M.S., CFLE

Project Manager

Julianne McGill, Ph.D.

Research Assistant Professor

Rachel Odomes

Program Analyst

Donna Roland

Outreach Administrator III

Shelby Murtaugh

Graduate Research Assistant

Rhees Johnson

Graduate Research Assistant

Undergraduate Research Assistants

Rebecca Stanley

Freddie Hodges

Brittany Wright

Kyra Smith

Casey Hamilton

Madison Strichik

Claire Sudduth

Zoey Davis

Lauren Portera

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